Screen shot 2017 02 23 at 1.11.55 PMNEW HAVEN: The Tech Website RIGHTCLICK.COM - is ranking New Haven the No.1 City In America for a Tech Start-Up. Right Click is a publication of Verizonfios, the telcom company's interent and calbe TV style service. The Fios service is not available in Connecticut.

Rightclick used a matrix of factors behind their ranking with a heavy emphasis on Internet access speed and usage.  The factors are Internet Usage, Top Speeds Rank, Competitive Salries, Cost of Living and Poplation. Other regions sited, Orlando, Fl, Santa Barbara, CA, Baton Rouge, [see chart].

FROM RIGHT CLICK:

"No, this isn’t a real estate scheme. There’s a lot more to launching a startup than picking out office space. But location is certainly something to think about if your plans are bigger than your parents’ basement. That’s why we went searching for the best U.S. cities to launch a startup."

ABOUT NEW HAVEN: 

From its thriving downtown to its idyllic coastline, New Haven has a lot to offer. With Yale University just minutes from center city, New Haven is ripe with the next generation of problem solvers and creative thinkers. A laundry list of startups have seen success on the Long Island sound, from Continuity Control, an online compliance management company to C8 Sciences, a cognitive skill development program. Who’s to say your name won’t be next?

 

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Screen shot 2017 02 09 at 4.14.54 PMInbox Health a Connecticut start up says they can help  health care prodivers, from very small practices to large health care systems better control their patient billing, insurance management  and the patient office experience. Inbox provide a HIPPA compliant software system and online portal that can be utilized even at very low costs. The company provide a three users model for as little as $79 per month and even has a pay as you go model for smaller practices.

Currently located in Bridgeport, the company is getting ready to move to New Haven in early Spring.  Inbox has raised $2.5 million of capital including a recent seed round of $1.5 million. The new investment was led by Connecticut Innovations [CII] which had invested in a still earlier seed stage and a diverse group of seed investors.

Deloitte Honorees

WILTON: Deloitte released its 2016 Technology Fast 500 rankings of the fastest-growing tech companies in North America.

Seven Connecticut companies have made the list, including: New Haven’s Achillion Pharmaceuticals. The  biotechnology/pharmaceutical company came in at no. 43, with 2,436 percent (revenue growth between 2012 and 2015). Achillion’s growth was driven by a joint marketing and development agreement with Johnson and Johnson’s Jannsen Pharmaceuticals, for rights to Achillion’s Hepatitus C drugs. The deal brought more than $225 million to the company and potential payments of $1 billion if regulatory and sales goals are met.

kellyFAIRFIELD: David Kelley was appointed the town’s Information Technology Director.  Kelley held the same position previously at the University of Hartford.

Kelley is a graduate of UofH with a Bachelor of Science in Engineering and Computer Science and a Master of Business Administration. Kelly is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional and has a FEMA National Incident Management System certificate. Kelley has been a member of the Academic Strategic Technology Policy Committee and the Northeast Executive Advisory Group and an alternate on the University Situation (Crisis) Management Team.

BRIDGEPORT: Mayor Joe Ganim  launched Bridgeport 311, utilizing New Haven’s SeeClickFix website and apps.

SeeClickFix located at 770 Chapel Street, New Haven says it, “has official partnerships with hundreds of cities, engaging hundreds of thousands of citizens in the resolution of millions of issues.”

Ganim said, Bridgeport 311 is to be used to “report problems ranging from potholes to blight and illegal dumping, noise and health hazards, animal control issues, missed trash pickups, graffiti, and many other issues.

wexford providencePROVIDENCE:  GE, Virgin Pulse and Johnson and Johnson are all the latest tech catches for Rhode Island. State incentives are at play as well as a new tech complex to house technology companies. Former Connecticut Department of Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor, is Rhode Island’s Commerce Secretary and the lead on the state’s tech incentives.

Virgin Pulse a health tech is owned by British Billionaire Richard Branson and is seeking $5.4 million to move its Framingham Mass., based company to Providence. VP says its project’s expected cost is $10.5 million. Virgin Pulse told the Providence Journal they expect to hire 300 employees within three years at an average pay of $73,000.

Johnson & Johnson the healthcare giant, which recently struck a deal with New Haven’s Achillion with a $225 million up front payment and a billion plus dollars potentially down the road, plans to open a “health technology center” with 75 jobs in 2017. 

recruiterFARMINGTON: Recruiter.com, an online global recruiting service and job market technology platform, launched a travel service and loyalty program in partnership through a partnership with Monaker Group ( OTCQB : MKGI ), an “innovative technology-driven” travel company. 

The new travel program and platform gives members access to discounted travel and vacation packages.

Recruiter.com says it “has a highly engaged membership base, working with hundreds of clients and employers, and managing a social media following of more than 2.8 million people.”

Adding, “the demographics of our members suggest they have high demand for both business and leisure travel. We saw the ability to be a first mover by delivering a specialized travel platform that offers value and convenience,” says Miles Jennings, CEO of Recruiter.com. 

NEW YORK: The U.S. Postal Service is testing out a new high-tech service, “Informed Delivery,” in the New York City area that gives people a quick glance at their mail before it’s delivered. The pilot program sends customers an email each morning with scanned images of the mail that will be delivered to their home that day. 

Your mail isn’t opened -- it’s left fully intact. You’re only going to see a photo of the outside of the envelope. But it gives you an idea what to expect when you get home and check your mailbox.

Informed Delivery first launched in the NYC and southern Connecticut area in December 2015 and is picking up steam. It’s expected to expand to other parts of New York, Long Island and New Jersey by summer 2017.

iStock 000005052572SmallNEW HAVEN: ASSA ABLOY has launched Unlocked, a six-episode podcast series focused on the security issues for colleges and universities. The series is hosted by Brian Adoff, cofounder of the campus card data management company SwiftData Technology, based in Springfield Gardens, New York.

According to Swiftdata, Adoff talks with “experts, manufacturers and end users to help demystify the world of physical security.” 

“Helping our customers navigate the numerous issues involved with campus security is a top priority for us,” says Jim Primovic, a campus national sales manager with, ASSA ABLOY.

bottoneDANBURY:- FuelCell Energy [Nasdaq: FCEL] is laying off 96 employees including layoffs at its headquarters in Danbury, and it manufacturing facility in Torrington.

FuelCell Energy designs, manufactures, operates and services fuel cell power plants.

Chip Bottone, president and CEO of FuelCell Energy, explained the move. “we are streamlining our business and cost structure as we reduce our production levels to meet the backlog we have today while positioning the company for long-term success.”

The company which was recently selected as one of the fastest growing companies in Connecticut by the Connecticut Technology Council and Marcum the accounting firm. FuelCell has experienced two important setbacks in the past year leading to the restructuring and the hopes of reducing operating costs by $6 million.

Quantum Slider 1600x564 bananaSOUTHINGTON: To many the next frontier in the green movement is food waste. Quantum Biopower in mid November opened Connecticut’s first “anaerobic digester” to turn food waste into energy.

Anaerobic digesting is not a new technology, far from it, Quantum’s own managing director Brian Paganini acknowledges it’s been around for several “hundred of years.” Simply put an organic compound – read food waste is placed in a sealed container without oxygenm add anaerobic bacteria, they do their work in the absence of oxygen and the little guys go to work breaking down the food waste and turning it into biogas [methane] which is then used to generate electricity.